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Hip Replacement Surgery

Florida Hospital’s highly talented orthopedic surgeons adopt a minimally invasive approach to hip replacement surgery, employing specialized training to perform the procedure through just a few small incisions. Our patients typically benefit from a quicker return to their daily lives. And because these techniques minimize surgical impact on the tissues surrounding the replaced hip joint, they also experience less post-surgical pain and scarring.  Request an appointment with a specialist today.

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Procedure overview

What is a hip replacement surgery?

Hip replacement, also called total hip arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace a worn out or damaged hip with a prosthesis (an artificial joint). This surgery may be considered following a hip fracture (breaking of the bone) or for someone who has severe pain due to arthritis.

Various types of arthritis may affect the hip joint. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects mostly middle-aged and older adults, may cause the breakdown of joint cartilage and adjacent bone in the hips. Rheumatoid arthritis, which causes inflammation of the synovial lining of the joint and results in excessive synovial fluid, may lead to severe pain and stiffness. Traumatic arthritis, arthritis due to injury, may also cause damage to the articular cartilage of the hip.

The goal of hip replacement surgery is to replace the parts of the hip joint that have been damaged and to relieve hip pain that cannot be controlled by other treatments.
A traditional hip replacement involves an incision several inches long over the hip joint. A newer approach that uses one or two smaller incisions to perform the procedure is called minimally invasive hip replacement. However, the minimally invasive procedure is not suited for all candidates for hip replacement. The physician will determine the best procedure for a person, based on that individual's situation.

Anatomy of the hip

Joints are formed where bones meet. Most joints are mobile, allowing the bones to move without friction or discomfort. The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint, which allows backward, forward, sideways, and rotating movements. The ball part of the hip joint is the head of the femur (thigh bone), and the acetabulum is the socket, a cup-like structure in the pelvis.

A hip joint consists of the following:

  • Cartilage. A type of tissue that covers the surface of a bone at a joint. Cartilage helps reduce the friction of movement within a joint.
  • Synovial membrane. A tissue that lines the joint and seals it into a joint capsule. The synovial membrane secretes synovial fluid (a clear, sticky fluid) around the joint to lubricate it.
  • Ligament. A type of tough, elastic connective tissue that surrounds the joint to give support and limits the joint's movement.
  • Tendon. A type of tough connective tissue that connects muscles to bones and helps to control movement of the joint.
  • Bursa. A fluid-filled sac located between bones, ligaments, or other adjacent structures that helps cushion joints.
  • Femur. Thighbone or upper leg bone.
  • Acetabulum. A socket or cuplike structure that holds the femur head.
Florida Hospital’s highly talented orthopedic surgeons adopt a minimally invasive approach to hip replacement surgery, employing specialized training to perform the procedure through just a few small incisions. Our patients typically benefit from a quicker return to their daily lives. And because these techniques minimize surgical impact on the tissues surrounding the replaced hip joint, they also experience less post-surgical pain and scarring.  Request an appointment with a specialist today.

Locations for Hip Replacement Surgery