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Developmental Disorders of the Female Reproductive Tract

Symptoms and Signs of the Developmental Disorders of the Female Reproductive Tract

Symptoms of developmental disorders of the female reproductive tract vary depending on the specific condition involved.

In some cases, the symptoms are obvious at birth. Problems with external genitals, such as a swollen clitoris or fused labia (the folds of skin around the vagina are joined), can be seen at birth. Cloacal abnormalities, in which the rectum, urinary tract and vagina may not develop separately in the womb, can cause severe pain, a swollen stomach and breathing problems for the newborn.

The abnormal chromosome patterns found in Intersex disorders include ambiguous genitalia at birth; an enlarged clitoris (clitoromegaly) that resembles a penis; a misplaced urethra opening; fused labia that may have the appearance of a male scrotum, and could have a lump of tissue; an inability to empty the bladder; and a lump in the abdomen of blood or mucus that cannot flow away.

Other times, symptoms of developmental disorders of the female reproductive tract may only appear as the girl ages. An imperforate hymen that blocks the vaginal opening and causes painful swelling may not be diagnosed until puberty.

Common signs of developmental disorders of the female reproductive tract that develop with age include:

  • Breasts and pubic hair do not develop at puberty
  • Girls develop male traits
  • Menstrual flow occurs even when using a tampon (an indication of a second vagina)
  • Monthly cramps without menstruation
  • Lumps in the stomach area or groin
  • Primary amenorrhea (not having monthly periods after puberty or by age 15)
  • Painful sex
  • Repeated pre-term births or miscarriages (that could result from a malformed uterus)

Locations for Developmental Disorders of the Female Reproductive Tract